Notable Native Americans on the Frontier

Also See: Native American Heroes & Leaders

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Rain-in-the-Face, aka: Ito-na-gaju, Exa-ma-gozua (1835?-1905) – On June 25-27, 1876, Lieutenant-Colonel George Custer, with thirteen commissioned officers, a surgeon, and 255 men were slaughtered in the Black Hills. Sitting Bull has received the notoriety and credit for this fight; but it was his cousin, Rain-in-the-Face, who planned and executed the battle. He, himself received a wound in the fight, which resulted in his having to use crutches for the rest of his life.

Chief Red Cloud, 1900

Chief Red Cloud, 1900

Chief Red Cloud (1822-1909) One of the most capable chiefs who resisted white settlement, he led the successful resistance known as Red Cloud’s War in 1866-1868.

Red Shirt (1845-1925) – An Oglala Sioux warrior who served in the capacity of chief at two Sioux, a position he was appointed to in 1866 by the War Department. He was a son of Victor Renville and a nephew of the celebrated Joseph Renville. He was born at Sweet Corn’s Village, Big Stone Lake, South Dakota in April 1824. He was a valued friend of the whites during the Sioux War of 1862-65. He died at the Sisseton Agency on August 26, 1902.

Gabriel Renville (1824-1902) – He was the last chief of the Sisseton Sioux, a position he was appointed to in 1866 by the War Department. He was a son of Victor Renville and a nephew of the celebrated Joseph Renville. He was born at Sweet Corn’s Village, Big Stone Lake, South Dakota in April 1824. He was a valued friend of the whites during the Sioux War of 1862-65. He died at the Sisseton Agency on August 26, 1902.

Toby Riddle – See Kaitchkona Winema

Roman Nose – (1835?-1868) – Cheyenne warrior and leader of the Plains Indian Wars of the 1860s.

Chief John Ross (1790-1866) – John Ross was the first and only elected Chief of the Cherokee Nation from the time it was formed until his death in 1866.

Sacagawea (1790?-1812?) ­ A Shoshone Indian woman who married French Canadian trapper, Toussaint Charbonneau, and became an integral part of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

Chief Satanta of the Kiowa tribe.

Chief Satanta of the Kiowa tribe.

Satanta (1820-1878) – Known to his people as Set-Tainte, meaning “White Bear Person,” Satanta was a great Kiowa warrior who would later become the principal chief in the Kiowa Wars of the 1860s-1870s and was known as “The Orator of the Plains.”

Scarface Charley (1851?-1896) – A celebrated Modoc warrior and chief of the Modoc tribe, he is best known through his connection with Captain Jack, or Kintpuash, during the Modoc War of 1872-73.

Schonchin, aka: Old Schonchin, Skonches (1797-1892) – The recognized head chief of the Modoc Indians at the time of the Modoc War of 1872-73.

Chief Seattle, aka: Sealth, Seathle, Seathl, or See-ahth (1780?-1866) – Leader of the Suquamish and Duwamish Native American tribes in present-day Washington. He was known as a great leader, orator, warrior and negotiator.

Sequoya, aka George Guess (1767?-1843) – The inventor of the Cherokee alphabet, silversmith, and politician.

Setangya, aka: Satank, Sitting Bear (1810?-1871) –  Setangya was a noted Kiowa chief, medicine man, and leader of the Kiowa honor society called “Koitsenk”, or the “Ten Bravest Warriors.”

Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull

Sitting Bull (1831-1890) – Lakota chief and holy man, most notable for his premonition of defeating the army at the Battle of the Little Bighorn.

Spotted Elk – See Big Foot, aka: Si Tanka

Chief Tecumseh (1768-1813)Shawnee Chief Tecumseh was a highly skilled warrior, orator, and statesman who advocated “civilized’ resistance.” 

Tall Bull (1815?-1869) – A Southern Cheyenne Chief, Tall Bull was also the leader of the fierce Dog Soldiers during the 1850s and 1860s in the Plains states. he was killed at the Battle of Summit Springs.

Chief Victorio (1825-1880) – Known as Bidu-ya or Beduiat to his Apache people, Victorio was a warrior and chief of the Chihenne band of the Chiricahua Apache in what is now New Mexico. Becoming hate-filled due to being forced onto an Arizona reservation and the subsequent ill-treatment of his people, Victorio escaped the reservation and went on a rampage in 1879-1880.

Fred Waite – Chickasaw Outlaw Turned Politician.

Stand Watie – Brigadier General of the Civil War.

Chief  Walkara, aka: Walker (1808?-1855) – The leader of the Ute Timpanogo band, Walkara had a reputation as a diplomat, horseman, and warrior, and was the primary leader in the Walker War.

Wovoka – Paiute Medicine Man & the Ghost Dance.

 

© Kathy Weiser/Legends of America, updated October 2019.

Indian Chiefs

Spotted Tail, Roman Nose, Old Man Afraid of His  Horses, Lone Horn, Whistling Elk, Pipe and an unknown Indian at Fort Laramie, Wyoming in 1868.

Also See:

Native American Heroes & Leaders

Legends, Myths & Tales of Native Americans

Native American Tribes

Totems & Their Meanings

Timeline of Events

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