Scarface Charley – Celebrated Modoc Warrior

 

Scarface Charley

Scarface Charley

Scarface Charley (1851?-1896) – A celebrated Modoc warrior and chief of the Modoc tribe, he is best known through his connection with Captain Jack, or Kintpuash, during the Modoc War of 1872-73.

By his people, he was known as Chǐkclǐkam-Lupalkuelátko, meaning “wagon scar-faced,” from having been run over by a mail stage when a child, hence the name by which he was known to the whites.

Captain Jack spoke of him as a relative, but it is said also that he was a Rogue River Indian of the Tipsoe Tyee (Bearded Chief’s) band and joined Captain Jack some years prior to the war of 1873, when 22 years of age. Scarface was among those who taunted Jack when, after the first attack and repulse of the white soldiers, he was disposed to enter into a treaty of peace.

When the Modoc became angered during Judge Steele’s last visit to them in the lava-beds, Scarface and Captain Jack saved the life of Steele by guarding him during the night; and when Odeneal and Dyar visited the Modoc, January 27, 1873, on behalf of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, Scarface would have killed them on the spot had he not been restrained by Captain Jack. He was also the first to fire on the troops when they attempted the arrest of Captain Jack’s band the next day in what is called the Battle of the Lost River.

After the execution of Kintpuash and three of his warriors for the murder of Major General Edward Canby and Reverend Eleazer Thomas, Scarface Charley was appointed by Colonel Frank Wheaton as chief of the Modoc who were to be sent to Oklahoma as prisoners of war. After a year in Oklahoma, Scarfaced Charley was replaced as chief by Bogus Charley, partly due to the latter’s better understanding of English. Afterwards he developed a line of traditionally influenced domestic furniture. He died on December 3, 1896.

 

By Kathy Weiser-Alexander, August, 2017.

Also See: 

Kintpuash, aka: Captain Jack – Modoc Warrior

The Modoc War

Native American Heroes and Leaders

Notable Native Americans on the Frontier

 

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