Cowboys, Trail Blazers, & Stagecoach Drivers List

 

Cowboys

Cowboys

Do not go where the path may lead;

go instead where there is no path

 and leave a trail.

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

A

Abbot Downing Company (1827-1847, 1865-1919) – The maker of the world-renowned Concord Stage, the organization built thousands of stagecoaches during the many decades they were in business.

Hugh Anderson (18??-1873) – The son of a wealthy Bell County, Texas cattleman, Anderson followed in his father’s footsteps, becoming a cowboy and driving the herds up the Texas Trails to Kansas. He was involved in the Hyde Park Gunfight in Newton, Kansas and was later killed in a revenge duel.

B

Billy Bailey  (18??-1871) – A lawman and cowboy, Bailey was thought to have been from Texas before winding up in Newton, Kansas where he was shot down in a gunfight.

William Becknell (1788-1856) – A frontiersman and trader who established the Santa Fe Trail.

John M. Bozeman

John M. Bozeman

John M. Bozeman (1835–1867) – Bozeman scouted and blazed the Bozeman Trail through Wyoming to Virginia City, Montana.

John Braden (18??-1896) – Working for various stagecoach outfits for several decades before settling down in Albuquerque, New Mexico, Braden died a hero when he saved several people from a burning wagon.

John Butterfield (1801-1869) – Getting his start as a stagecoach driver at the age of 19, Butterfield parlayed his shrewd business sense to own and operate American Express and the Overland Mail Company.

C

Nate Champion (1857-1892) – A top Texas cowboy, Champion moved to Wyoming where he became involved in the Johnson County War and was killed.

Jesse Chisholm (1805?- 1868) – Though Jesse Chisholm blazed the famous Chisholm Trail, he never herded cattle. Rather, he used the path to transport goods to and from his trading posts.

John Simpson Chisum (1824-1884) – John Chisum was a cattle baron who moved longhorn herds from Texas into New Mexico in the mid-1800s, where he founded one of the largest cattle ranches in the American West.

Clanton Gang, aka: The Cowboys – The Clanton family and their ranch hands were a loosely organized gang of outlaws who operated along the Mexican border, stealing cattle, robbing  stagecoaches, ambushing teamsters, and committing murder.

William “Buffalo Bill” Frederick Cody (1846-1917) Buffalo Bill was a freighter, cattle driver, Pony Express rider, Civil War soldier, buffalo hunter, and army scout before he began entertaining great numbers of people in his Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show.

F

Mary Fields

Mary Fields

Mary Fields, aka: Stagecoach Mary (1832-1914) – Born as a slave in Tennessee, Fields was one of the first women entrepreneurs, stagecoach drivers, pioneers of the American West.

Clark “Old Chieftain” Foss, aka: Old Foss (1819-??) – A boisterous and colorful driver, Foss ran a stage through Napa Valley, California during the 1860s and took many sightseers to the famed geysers in the Calistoga and Geyserville area.

Johnny Fry (1840-1863) – The first “official” westbound rider of the Pony Express and a Union soldier killed during the Civil War.

G

Charles J. Goodnight (1836-1929) – Goodnight was a cowboy, and Texas Ranger who blazed the Goodnight-Loving Trail, invented the chuckwagon, and become part owner in one of the largest ranches in the Texas panhandle.

George “Baldy” Green – One of the most popular stage drivers in the Sierra Nevadas, his stages were so prone to robbery, that he was finally let go.

H

Aztec Cowboys, 1877

Aztec Cowboys, 1877

The Hash-Knife Outfit (1884-1900) – The Aztec Land and Cattle Company of Boston, became the third-largest cattle company in North America in the late 1800s, headquartered in Holbrook, Arizona.

Robert “Pony Bob” Haslam (1840-1912) A Pony Express rider who set the record for the longest ride, Pony Bob also served as a U.S. Deputy Marshal, an army scout, and a stage driver for Wells-Fargo

Charles C. Haynes (1837-??) – One of the most prominent drivers on the Overland Stage Line, Haynes drove for 20 years.

Ben Holladay (1819-1887) – Holladay began a number of stagecoach route and became known as the “Stagecoach King.”

I

Bose Ikard (1847-1929) – A former slave, Ikard honed his cowboy skills and rode with Charles Goodnight.

L

Gordon William “Pawnee Bill” Lillie – (1860-1942) – A performer in Buffalo Bill Cody’s Wild West Show, Pawnee Bill later formed his own act, becoming so popular that he was stiff competition for Buffalo Bill.

Nat Love, aka: Deadwood Dick (1854-1921) – Nat Love, who was also known as “Deadwood” Dick was said to have been the greatest black cowboy in all of the Old West.

Oliver Loving (1812-1867) – A cattle rancher and pioneer of the cattle drive who, along with Charles J. Goodnight, developed the Goodnight-Loving Trail. He was killed by Indians while on a cattle drive.

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