Gunfighter List

Go to Last Name beginning with:  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

S

Custom Wanted Poster

Personalized Wanted Poster

Manuel Sagolia – A gunman in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico, he rode with the posse that killed John Tunstall on February 18, 1878.

Justo Salas – A New Mexico gunman who was involved in a 1900 shoot-out at a dance hall.

Hijino Salazar – A gunman in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico.

Yginio Salazar – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. He survived the conflict and died of old age in New Mexico in 1936.

Eusebio Sanchez – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. Afterwards he disappeared.

Jose Maria Sanchez – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. Afterwards he disappeared.

Anastacio Sandoval – A gunman, he shot and killed Cypriano Montoya on March 20, 1884, in Anton Chico, New Mexico.

August Santleben – A gunman, he ran a stage line from 1867 between Texas and Mexico and killed several Mexican outlaws and hostile Indians. He died on September 19, 1911.

James Albert “Ab” Saunders – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. He survived but was wounded during the conflict. Several years later when he was having surgery to correct continuing problems with the injury, he died of complications in San Francisco, California on February 5, 1883.

William Saunders – A gunman, he shot Sid Moore in June, 1885 in White Oaks, New Mexico.

John Scroggins – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. Afterwards he disappeared.

Josiah Gordon “Doc” Scurlock (1850-1929)  – A gunman, friend of Billy the Kid, and the third leader of the Lincoln County Regulators, who fought for the McSween faction of the Lincoln County War. He survived the conflict and died of old age at Eastland, Texas on July 25, 1929. See Article HERE.

Carey Seaman – A gunman and resident of Coffeyville, Kansas, he killed Dick Broadwell and wounded Emmett Dalton when the Dalton Gang attempted to rob two Coffeyville banks on November 5, 1892.

Manuel “Indian” Segovia – A member of Jesse Evans Gang during New Mexico’s Lincoln County War. He was killed by the Regulators on May 19, 1878 at Seven Rivers, New Mexico.

John Henry Selman (1839–1896)Texas lawman, gunfighter, and an outlaw, Selman rustled cattle around Fort Griffin, Texas with John Larn. He befriended Billy the Kid during the Lincoln County War, and killed John Wesley Hardin in August 1895. George Scarborough killed him on April 6, 1896. See Article HERE.

Charles Angelo Siringo (1855-1928) – A gunman and one of the most famous detectives of the Pinkerton National Detective Agency, Siringo also served as a lawman for many years and became an author.He died in California in 1928. See Article HERE.

John Shears – A gunman, he killed W.W. Pruner on June 2, 1888.

Luke Short

Luke Short

Luke Short (1854-1893) – Earning a reputation as a gunfighter in Dodge City, Kansas, Short later moved to Texas where he was involved in the Short-Courtright Duel in 1887, and shot and killed a Charles Wright who was trying to muscle him out of business in 1890. In 1893, he became desperately sick from an unknown illness and died in bed at the age of 39. See Article HERE.

“Texas” John Horton Slaughter (1841–1922) – A Texas Ranger, Slaughter later moved on to become the Cochise County, Arizona Sheriff where with his six-shooter and sawed off shotgun, cleaned up Arizona Territory more than any other single individual. He died on February 15, 1922. See Article HERE.

“Six Shooter” Bill Smith, aka: John Henry Jankins, California Jim (1856?-1882) – A gunman and petty outlaw who enjoyed wounding people without killing them. See Article HERE.

James L. “Whispering” Smith (18??-1914) – A gunfighter and a lawman, Smith served as New Orleans Police Detective, Railroad Detective for several companies, stock detective, Chief of Indian Police. See Article HERE.

Joe Smith – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. Afterwards he disappeared.

“Tiger Sam” Smith, aka: Fred Wyat – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico, Though he survived the conflict, he would not be so lucky when he ran into Apache Indians in April, 1880 and was killed.

Charles Snow, aka: Johnson – A gunman, he was killed in New Mexico on August 12, 1881.

George “Buffalo Bill” Spawn – A member of Jesse Evans Gang during New Mexico’s Lincoln County War. Nothing known of life following the conflict.

Bob Speakes – A member of the Seven Rivers Warriors who fought in New Mexico’s Lincoln County War. When the conflict was over he became a member of Selman’s Scouts, a vicious gang that terrorized the county. He later moved to Texas, enlisted in the Texas Rangers in 1880, was soon discharged, then disappeared.

Pete Spence, aka: Peter Spencer, Elliot Larkin Ferguson (1852?-1914) – Stage robber, suspected murderer, and Clanton “cowboy,” Spence was thought to have been one of the killers behind the assassination of Morgan Earp. See Article PETE.

Sam Sperry – A gunman in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico.

Steven “Dirty Steve” Stephens – Fought with the Regulators in the Lincoln County War of New Mexico. He survived the conflict and was thought to have moved to Denver, Colorado.

Frank C. Stillwell (1857-1882) – A member of the Clanton Gang in Arizona, he also served as Cochise County Deputy Sheriff in 1881. Suspected of killing Morgan Earp, Stillwell was ambushed and killed by Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday.

Simpson Stilwell, aka: Commanche Jack – A gunman and lawman, he scouted for the Army in Texas and brought in several outlaws.

Joe Stinson – A gunman, he shot Wall Henderson in October, 1871.

Charles “Charlie” Storms – (18??-1881) – A professional gunfighter and gambler, Storms lived through several gunfights in Deadwood, South Dakota before arriving in Tombstone, Arizona, where he tangled with Luke Short and lost in 1881. See Article HERE.

Dallas Stoudenmire (1845-1882) – A lawman and gunfighter, Stoudenmire joined the Texas Rangers in 1874 and was city marshal of EI Paso, Texas in 1881. He killed several men in that capacity. In 1882, he resigned as marshal and became a U.S. Deputy Marshal. He was killed on September 18, 1882 by James and Doc Manning in El Paso. See Article HERE.

James Sullivan – A New Mexico gunfighter, Sullivan killed John Houston at Black Hawk, New Mexico in April 1884.

William E. “Billy” Sutton (1846-1874) – A native of south Texas, Sutton served in the Confederate army in the Civil War and afterwards moved his family to Clinton, Texas, where he ranched and soon came into conflict with the Taylor Clan. He also served as a Deputy Sheriff and on March 25, 1868, he shot and killed Charley Taylor, when he tried to arrest him for horse theft. Later that year, on Christmas Eve, Sutton killed another of the clan — Buck Taylor, as well as  another man named Dick Chisholm in a saloon in Clinton, Texas, after they argued regarding the sale of some horses. These killings spawned the Sutton-Taylor feud, one of the longest and bloodiest feuds in Texas history. Making matters worse for the Taylor faction was when Sutton was appointed to the State Police Force, under Captain Jack Helm. The Police Force, along with Union soldiers, was tasked with enforcing “Reconstruction,” much to the chagrin of many a Southern sympathizer. Sutton led a band of “Regulators” that at times, numbered as many as 200 men, which included such frontier characters as cattle baron Shanghai Pierce, Indian fighter Joe Tumlinson, and tough-as-nails lawman, Jack Helm. For six years, Sutton led the Regulators in terrorizing the region, killing dozens of men, until finally Sutton was shot down by Jim and Billy Taylor on March 11, 1874. When Sutton had tried to make his escape, by boarding a New Orleans-bound steamer out of Indianola, the Taylor boys opened fire on him, dropping him to the deck in front of his horrified wife.

Go to Last Name beginning with:  A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *