Missouri Civil War Battles

 

Battle of Wilsons Creek, Missouri by Kurz & Allison, 1893

Battle of Wilsons Creek, Missouri by Kurz & Allison, 1893

 

Operations at the Ohio and Mississippi River Confluence – November 1861

Belmont – November 7, 1861

Control Missouri Campaign – June-October 1861

Boonville – June 17, 1861
Carthage – July 5, 1861
Wilson’s Creek  – August 10, 1861
Dry Wood Creek – September 2, 1861
Lexington – September 13-20, 1861
Liberty – September 17, 1861
Fredericktown – October 21, 1861
Springfield – October 25, 1861

Operations in Northeast Missouri – 1861-62

Mount Zion Church – December 26, 1861
Roan’s Tan Yard – January 8, 1862

Joint Operations on the Middle Mississippi River – February 1862

New Madrid/Island No. 10 – February 28-April 8, 1862

Operations North of Boston Mountains – 1862

Kirksville – August 6-9, 1862
Independence – August 11, 1862
Compton’s Ferry – August 10-August 13, 1862
Yellow Creek – August 13, 1862
Lone Jack – August 15-16, 1862
Newtonia – September 30, 1862
Clark’s Mill – November 7, 1862

Marmaduke’s First Expedition into Missouri – January 1863

Springfield – January 8, 1863
Hartville – January 9-11, 1963

Marmaduke’s Second Expedition into Missouri – April 1863

Cape Girardeau – April 25, 1863

Price’s Missouri Expedition – August-October, 1864

Fort Davidson – September 27, 1864
Boonville – October 11, 1864
Glasgow – October 15, 1864
Sedalia – October 15, 1864
Lexington – October 19, 1864
Little Blue River – October 21, 1864
Independence – October 22, 1864
Byram’s Ford – October 22-23, 1864
Westport – October 23, 1864
Marmiton River – October 25, 1864
Newtonia – October 28, 1864

Missouri Civil War Battles

Missouri Civil War Battles

Operations at the Ohio and Mississippi River Confluence – November 1861 – On November 6, 1861, Brigadier General U.S. Grant left Cairo, Illinois, by steamers, in conjunction with two gunboats, to make a demonstration against Columbus, Kentucky. However, he landed on the Missouri shore, out of the range of Confederate artillery at Columbus, and instead started marching the mile to Belmont, Missouri.

Belmont – November 7, 1861 – Part of the Operations at the Ohio and Mississippi River Confluence this battle took place in Mississippi County, Missouri on November 7, 1861. On November 6, 1861, Brigadier General Ulysses S. Grant left Cairo, Illinois, by steamers, in conjunction with two gunboats, to make a demonstration against Columbus, Kentucky. The next morning, Grant learned that Confederate troops had crossed the Mississippi River from Columbus to Belmont, Missouri, to intercept two detachments sent in pursuit of Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson and, possibly, to reinforce Major General Sterling Price’s force. He landed on the Missouri shore, out of the range of Confederate artillery at Columbus, and started marching the mile to Belmont. At 9:00 in the morning, an engagement began. The Federals routed the Confederates out of their Belmont cantonment and destroyed the Rebel supplies and equipment they found because they did not have the means to carry them off. The scattered Confederate forces reorganized and received reinforcements from Columbus. Counterattacked by the Confederates, the Union force withdrew, re-embarked, and returned to Cairo. Grant did not accomplish much in this operation, but, at a time when little Union action occurred anywhere, many were heartened by any activity. Resulting in a Union victory, total casualties were Union 498 and Confederate 966.

John C. Fremont by Ehrgott, Forbriger and Co

Control Missouri Campaign – June-October 1861 – Missouri, like the three other “border states” of DelawareMaryland, and Kentucky, was deemed critical to the Lincoln Administration due to its geographical position and questionable loyalty to the North because it was a “slavery state.” At the outbreak of the Civil WarMajor General John C. Fremont was appointed to lead the Western Department of the Union Army. However, Fremont spent more energy in fortifying the city of St. Louis, Missouri than he did equipping the troops in the field. As a result, his forces suffered several losses, particularly a major defeat at Wilson’s Creek on August 10, 1861.

Boonville – June 17, 1861 – Also referred to as the First Battle of Boonville, this battle took place in Cooper County. The Union victory was led by Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon, while the Confederates were headed by Colonel John S. Marmaduke. The skirmish resulted from pro-Southern Governor, Claiborne Jackson’s desire to secede and join the Confederacy. As a result, Union Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon set out to put down Jackson’s Missouri State Guard, commanded by Sterling Price. Reaching Jefferson City, the state capital, Lyon discovered that Jackson and Price had retreated towards Boonville. Lyon re-embarked on steamboats, transported his men to below Boonville and marched to the town to engage the Rebels. In a relatively short battle, Lyon dispersed the Confederates and took command of Boonville. This early victory established Union control of the Missouri River and helped temporarily douse attempts to place Missouri in the Confederacy. Estimated casualties in the battle were 31 Union and 50 Confederate.

Battle of Carthage, Missouri

Battle of Carthage, Missouri

Carthage – July 5, 1861 – Taking place in Jasper County, the battle resulted after Brigadier General Nathaniel Lyon pursued Governor Claiborne Jackson and approximately 4,000 State Militia after the Confederate defeat at Boonville. Colonel Franz Sigel was also leading another force of about 1,000 Union troops into southwest Missouri. When Claiborne Jackson heard that Sigel and his troops were encamped at Carthage on July 4th, he took command of the troops and began to formulate a plan to attack the much smaller Union force. The next morning, Jackson moved in on Sigel, establishing a battle line on a ridge ten miles north of Carthage, inducing Sigel to attack him.

Sigel responded as Claiborne had anticipated and moved to attack the next day. However, when he saw a large Confederate force on his left flank, he withdrew. Though these were actually unarmed Confederate recruits, Sigel had no way of knowing that. The Rebels pursued Sigel’s forces but the Colonel conducted a successful rearguard action. By evening, he and his troops were inside Carthage and under cover of darkness, and then retreated to Sarcoxie. Though the battle was relatively insignificant, the pro-Southern elements in Missouri, anxious for any good news, championed their first victory.

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