Joseph Doyle – Colorado Trader and Politician

 

Joseph Doyle, Colorado trader

Joseph Doyle, Colorado trader

Joseph Bainbridge Doyle was a trapper, Indian trader, businessman, and Colorado pioneer and politician.

Often called “Jose”, Joseph Bainbridge Doyle was born on July 10, 1817, in Shenandoah County, Virginia to Alexander Doyle and Ana Maria Evans Doyle. By the early 1830’s his family moved to Belleville, Illinois across the Mississippi River from St. Louis, Missouri.

In 1838 he went to work as a clerk for the Bent, St. Vrain & Company in their St. Louis operations and for the next several years would work as a storekeeper, bookkeeper, trader, and teamster, traveling along the Santa Fe Trail several times. By 1841, he was working full-time at Bents Fort on the Arkansas River in Colorado. There he became acquainted with Alexander BarclayGeorge Simpson, and Robert Fisher, who were also working at the fort.

When these men, along with several others, established the El Pueblo trading post about 70 miles upstream from Bents Fort, in 1842, Doyle followed and used his savings to buy into the trading partnerships. Here, were also a number of traders including Mathew Kinkead, Francisco Conn, Joseph Mantz, and “Uncle Dick” Richens Wootton.

In 1844, Doyle, along with George Simpson and Alexander Barclay constructed a new trading post about 23 miles west of El Pueblo, in a settlement that would become known as Hardscrabble. The same year, Joseph Doyle married Maria De La Cruz “Cruzita” Suaso on October 14, when she was only about 13 years old. The couple would have several children. Cruz was the daughter of Alexander Barclay’s wife, Teresita Sandoval Suaso. Another of Teresita’s daughters married George Simpson.

Mora River Valley, New Mexico

Mora River Valley, New Mexico

In 1848, Doyle and Alexander Barclay built Fort Barclay at the junction of the Mora and Sapello Rivers on the Santa Fe Trail near the settlement of Watrous, New Mexico. They hoped to not only to capitalize on the trade with the emigrants but, also to sell the fort to the military at some point. However, the army not only turned them down but tried to order them off their own land so the Army could build their own fort there.

In the beginning, Fort Barclay was bustling with trading activity daily, served as a stagecoach station, provided housing for men, shelter for animals, and its stockade furnished protection from Indian raids. In 1851, the work of the establishing Fort Union, about nine miles northwest of Watrous, began. Located near Doyle and Barclay’s land, the Army again tried to order them off, but Doyle and Barclay took the army to court, which dragged on for several years.

Despite its promising beginning, Barclay’s Fort never turned into a profitable business and by October 1853, Alexander Barclay was living at the fort by himself. He and Doyle advertised the fort for sale in the Santa Fe newspapers but, never had an inquiry. Barclay died at the fort in December 1855. Afterward, Joseph Doyle took in Barclay’s wife, Teresita. He continued the litigation with the army and finally won out. In 1856, Doyle sold the land and the fort to a German immigrant named William Kronig, who eventually built the Phoenix Ranch. The ranch, which still exists today, is all that is left of Doyle and Barclay’s previous holdings at Fort Barclay.

In 1858, gold was discovered in Colorado and Doyle formed the J.B. Doyle Company and was soon hauling wagon loads of food, grain, clothing, and other supplies to Denver City becoming very prosperous.

Huerfano River, Colorado

Huerfano River, Colorado

In November 1859, Doyle purchased 1,200 acres from the Vigil and St. Vrain Land Grant on the west bank of the Huerfano River east of Pueblo, Colorado. Dick Wootton and Charles Autobees had ranches nearby. On his land, he brought in lumber milled in St. Louis, Missouri and built a large two-story white clapboard house for his family that was known as “Casa Blanca” or the “White House”. The house, with its green shutters, was not characteristic of the architectural style of the west, but rather with the architectural style of Doyle’s youth in the east. Sitting near a segment of the Denver to Santa Fe Road, the “White House” became a landmark in the area, and the road became known as the “White House Road.”

Casa Blanca, Doyle Ranch, Colorado

Casa Blanca, Doyle Ranch, Colorado

He also built adobe cabins for his many farm workers, one of the first flour mills in Colorado, granaries, storehouses, and one of the first schoolhouses, which served his children and those of his workers. His land stretched for miles along the Huerfano River and by 1861 he had built irrigation ditches bringing 600 acres into cultivation and built corrals for sheep and cattle which grazed on the uplands. Corn, potatoes, beans, oats, cotton, melons, and tobacco were cultivated on his farm. Eventually, his ranch also boasted an adobe trading post, a and blacksmith shop, and a post office, in which Joseph Doyle would serve as the first postmaster.

At the same time, Doyle began importing goods from the east and along with his own agricultural products and those of neighboring farms, he opened up stores in Auraria (later a part of Denver), Canon City, Tarryall, Colorado City (now Colorado Springs), and Pueblo.

George Simpson

George Simpson

At some point, George Simpson also made a claim of land in the same area and built a house near Charles Autobees‘ ranch. After Colorado officially became a territory on February 28, 1861, the small settlement that had grown up around Autobees’ Ranch, became the county seat of the newly formed Huerfano County. The first election of officers occurred on December 2, 1861, at which time Charles Autobees and Joseph Doyle were made county commissioners and George Simpson became the county clerk and recorder.

In 1864, Doyle was elected as a representative of the Colorado Territorial Council in Denver, representing Pueblo, Huerfano, El Paso, and Fremont Counties. While serving in this post in Denver, Doyle died of a heart attack on March 4, 1864. He was 46 years old. Governor John Evans and other dignitaries escorted his body home to his ranch where he was buried in the family cemetery on a hill overlooking his ranch. At the time of his death, he was considered the richest man in Colorado. His wife, Maria De La Cruz “Cruzita” Suaso Doyle, died the next year.

Doyle Cemetery, Colorado

Doyle Cemetery, Colorado

In 1874 the Doyle children sold the ranch, with the stipulation that the Mexican village that grew up around the ranch be allowed to remain as long as their grandmother, Teresita Sandoval Suaso Alexander, lived there. She died in 1894 and was buried in the Doyle Cemetery.

The Doyle Settlement was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in April 1980. Representing one of the earliest, non-mining communities in Colorado, it consists of some of the old farm and grazing lands, foundations, and ruins of various buildings, the old schoolhouse, and the Doyle cemetery. Though still standing, the schoolhouse is in a very poor state of repair. The gravestones, despite some vandalism, still lie on the hill overlooking the site where these early settlers lived, worked, and died.

The site is located southeast of Pueblo along the Huerfano River on Doyle Road.
© Kathy Weiser-Alexander, July 2018.

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