Walter Scott, Better Known as Death Valley Scotty

Death Valley Scotty

Death Valley Scotty

Walter Edward Perry Scott, aka Death Valley Scotty (1872-1954) – The youngest of six children, Walter Edward Perry Scott was was born in Cynthiana, Kentucky in 1872 and raised on a horse farm. At the age of eleven, he ran off to Nevada to join his two older brothers, Warner and Bill. His first job after arriving by train was as a water boy for a survey party along the California Nevada state line, part of which ran close to Death Valley. When the survey was completed Scott found work with Harmony Borax Works.

Scott was an accomplished horseman and in 1888 a talent scout for Bill Cody discovered Scotty and hired him to work as a cowboy with Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. Although his engagement with the show lasted for 12 years, it was only seasonal employment. When not fully engaged with the show, Scott would return to Death Valley and pick up odd jobs. His connection with the area became so well known that eventually Death Valley Scotty became his nickname.

Scott left the Wild West Show after a disagreement with Buffalo Bill in 1900 and began a new profession that brought him even more fame and riches — gold prospecting. He convinced several wealthy businessmen that he had a claim to a fabulous gold mine in Death Valley. Scotty agreed to split the all profits, provided they first offer money to extract the ore. Over the next few years, Scotty apparently had little luck prospecting in Death Valley.

Scotty’s “Battle” of Wingate Pass

In one of his most infamous cons, Walter Scott developed an elaborate ‘hoax’ against a mining engineer who was insisting on seeing his gold mine before making recommendations to investors back east.  The famous incident, now called “Battle” of Wingate Pass, happened in 1906, when New England mining promoter A.Y. Pearl had gained interest of some bankers and businessmen in Scotty’s gold properties. The investors insisted on having Daniel E. Owen, a respected Boston mining engineer, personally inspect the property.

Thus, that February, Owen, Pearl and Scott prepared for their journey into Death Valley. Along with them were Albert M. Johnson, president of the National Life Insurance Company of Chicago, as well as Scotty’s brothers Bill and Warner Scott, Bill Keys, who had prospected with Walter Scott, Los Angeles miner A.W. DeLyle St. Clair, and a local character named Jack Brody.

The plan to keep the mining investors in the dark about Scotty not actually having a mine seemed simple enough. He hoped to scare away Daniel Owen by staging a shootout to disrupt the expedition.  After being on the trail for a just a few days, Scotty instructed his brother Bill to stay at their campsite at Lone Willow Spring, and told Bill Keys and Jack Brody to push on to look for any danger. Giving them a good head start, the rest of the party finally pushed on over Wingate Pass and down the wash toward to the south end of the valley. As they were trying to establish a new camp for the night, shots were heard and a rider, an ex-deputy sheriff from Goldfield, Nevada, came to them with a story of being fired upon in an ambush that stampeded his pack train.

With Walter Scott’s assurances that he could fight off any outlaws, the party resumed their journey the next morning. When they reached the site of the earlier reported shooting, Scotty drew his rifle and fired a couple of shots, startling the mules pulling the lead wagon with his brother Warner and Daniel Owen, which resulted in Owen falling over backwards. It was about this time that a shot from behind a stone breastwork on a cliff to the south hit Warner Scott in the groin.  Scotty, realizing the seriousness of his brothers wound, suddenly galloped toward the ambushers yelling  at them to stop shooting. Walter Scott’s actions left plenty of doubt with Owen about the ambushes authenticity. The party then headed back, with Bill Keys and Jack Brody never rejoining them. Warner, patched up, was put on a train for Los Angeles, and Albert Johnson left immediately back to Chicago.

The incident would result in arrest warrants for Walter Scott, Bill Keys and Jack Brody for assault with a deadly weapon. It would also put Scotty in and out of jail several times over the next months. Finally, six years later, Walter Scott confessed in a Los Angeles courtroom to long-term and full scale fraud and deceit.

Meanwhile, after receiving no results from the fabled gold mine, all of his investors felt that they had been conned and began to back out of their investments. Scotty, however, started turning up at the finest hotels and saloons of California and Nevada, and began what would become his legendary spending sprees.

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