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Kansas - Legends of Ahs IconKANSAS LEGENDS

Fort Riley, Kansas - History & Hauntings

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Vintage Fort Riley

Vintage Fort Riley, courtesy of Betty Daniel Gudat of San Antonio, Texas

 

Fort Riley History

 

The site of Fort Riley was chosen by surveyors in the fall of 1852 and was first called Camp Center, due to its proximity to the geographical center of the United States. The following spring, three companies of the 6th infantry began the construction of temporary quarters at the camp.

 

On June 27, 1853, the camp's name was changed to Fort Riley in honor of Major General Bennett C. Riley, who had led the first military escort along the Santa Fe Trail and had died earlier in the month.

 

The fort's initial purpose was to protect the many pioneers and traders who were moving along the Oregon-California and Santa Fe Trails.

 

 

 

Kansas Territorial Capitol

The Kansas Territorial Capitol was built in

1855. This image available for photographic prints

 and downloads HERE!

 

Many of the buildings at the fort were built with the native limestone of the area, several of which continue to stand today. By 1855, the post was well-established and as more and more people moved westward, additional quarters, stables and administrative buildings were authorized to be built. In the July, 56 mule teams arrived at the fort, loaded with materials and soldiers to expand the fort.

 

However, just a few short weeks later, cholera broke out among the fort and though the epidemic lasted only a few days, it left in its wake some 75-125 people dead.

 

Also in July, the first territorial legislature met at Fort Riley at the now extinct town of Pawnee, Kansas. At that time, the issue as to whether Kansas was going to declare itself as a "free-state" or a "slavery" state was upper most in the minds of the territory's new residents, as well as the nation that looked on. Fraudulently elected legislators from the border area of Missouri met here briefly and quickly voted to move the Capitol closer to "home" in the Kansas City area. The members were mostly Missourians elected in an effort to make Kansas a slave state. Used only briefly as the capital, the legislature quickly moved to Lecompton, Kansas and the building fell into ruin until its restoration in 1928 by the Union Pacific railroad. Today, the building still stands as a museum in the present area of Camp Whitside.

 

As tensions and bloodshed increased between the pro and anti-slavery settlers, resulting in what has become known as "Bleeding Kansas," Fort Riley's troops took on the additional task of "policing" the troubled territory, while continuing to patrol the Santa Fe Trail as Indian attacks increased.

 

When the Civil War broke out, the vast majority of the troops stationed at Fort Riley were sent eastward. However, some soldiers were left to continue to guard those traveling west and the base was utilized as a prisoner of war camp for captured Confederates. After the Civil War, troops from Fort Riley were needed to protect workers constructing the Kansas Pacific Railroad from Indian attacks.

 

In 1866 and 1867 Lieutenant George Armstrong Custer was stationed at the fort. Wild Bill Hickok was a scout for Fort Riley starting in 1867. On January 1, 1893, Fort Riley became the site of the Cavalry and Light Artillery School, which continued until 1943, when the Cavalry was disbanded. Several times throughout the years, the famous 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments of all-black soldiers, referred to as Buffalo Soldiers, were stationed at the fort.

 

Through both world wars and up until today, the post has remained active. The military reservation now covers more than 100,000 acres and has a daytime population of nearly 25,000, which includes the 1st Infantry Division, nicknamed the Big Red One.

 

Fort Riley is located on the north bank of the Kansas River three miles north of Junction City.

 

 

Contact Information:

 

Fort Riley Museum Division

785-239-2737

 

 

Fort Riley Hauntings

 

Artillery Parade Field It is said that a woman wrapped in chains has often been seen walking across the field on clear nights. Who this woman was and what she might have done wrong in order to wind up in chains has never been known.

Camp Funston - Camp Funston was the largest of sixteen divisional cantonment (temporary or semi-permanent military quarters) training camps constructed during World War I. Designated to be located at Fort Riley due to its central location in the nation, construction began on July 1, 1917 and the camp was completed on December 1st of the same year. With a capacity of over 50,000, it drew trainees from all over the Great Plains states. However, not long after the camp was completed and filled with soldiers, the 1918 flu epidemic, called the "Influenza Pandemic of 1918" hit the camp. Worldwide, this fatal flu virus, cited as the most devastating epidemic in recorded world history, killed more people than did World War I, an estimated 20 to 40 million people, including some 675,000 Americans. A global disaster, the flu took its toll on Camp Funston and Fort Riley, like it did the rest of the world.

Camp Funston in 1918

Camp Funston in 1918. This image available for photographic prints and downloads HERE!

When the war was over in 1918, the camp, as well as the Army shrunk and by 1922, Camp Funston officially ceased to exist. Today, its many buildings now serve as temporary housing.

Though those WWI soldiers-in-training are long gone; seemingly, at least one of them has chosen to stay. First reported in the late 1960's, a ghostly soldier in World War I uniform has been seen in the area, continuing his patrol. The tale alleges that a Public Works employee first spied the ghostly figure while repairing downed electrical lines. In the midst of a snow storm, he noticed a soldier, in a heavy wool overcoat and rifle over his shoulder, pacing back and forth near the site of the old world War I era gymnasium. After repairing the lines, he decided to share his thermos of hot coffee with the young man; however, when he approached the area where he had spied him, the soldier was gone. More perplexing, was the snow-covered ground showed no sign of footprints. Many believe that this long forgotten soldier is one of those who died during the 1918 flu pandemic.

 

 

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Also See:

Haunted Fort Dodge

Haunted Fort Hays

Haunted Fort Leavenworth

Haunted Fort Scott

 

 

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Kansas Historic Book Collection - 35 Historic Books on CDKansas Historic Book Collection - 35 Historic Books on CD - The Historical Kansas Book Collection is a collection of 35 volumes relating to the history of Kansas and its people primarily in the 18th and 19th centuries. Several of the volumes have great period illustrations and portraits of relevant historical figures. Includes such titles as the History of Kansas (1899), History of Kansas Newspapers (1916), All five volumes of A Standard History of Kansas (1918), Pioneer Days in Kansas (1903), and dozens of others.

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