Native American and Other Ancient Remedies

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Tendonitis:

  • Ginger Root – Utilized as both a spice and medicine throughout the world.

 

 

Throat Problems – Ulcers, Sore Throat, Tonsillitis:

  • American Licorice – Chewed or used in teas for internal issues, in a poultice externally.
  • Blackberry -Leaves are made into gargles to sooth mouth and throat ailments.
  • Bloodroot – Primarily used as a medicine for respiratory and digestive problems, it also used externally. Today, we know it is toxic and the FDA has classified it as unsafe.
  • Buck Brush – Applies to a number of North American shrubs used in herbal medicine.
  • Chokecherry – Used as both a source of food and medicine, it was considered one of the most important herbs in Native American medicine.
  • Eucalyptus – Teas and ointments used for a variety of purposes.
  • Evening Primrose – Used for both food and in medicinal remedies, decoctions were used for internal and external ailments.
  • Goldenrod – Long used for a variety of ailments.
  • Goldenseal – Used internally and external for medicinal issues. Should not be taken by pregnant women.
  • Honeysuckle – Used in traditional herbal remedies for thousands of years.
  • Kava – Used there for thousands of years as a folk remedy and as a social and ceremonial beverage.
  • Licorice Root – Used as flavoring in food and for herbal remedies.
  • Marshmallow Root – Dating back thousands of years, this root has been used as a food and medicine.
  • Mullein – A tobacco-like plant and one of the oldest herbs, it has a long history of use as a medicine.
  • Native Hemlock – Used by Native Americans as a dye, for tanning hides, making baskets and wooden items, as well as medicinal remedies.
  • Oak – Acorns and bark used for a variety of medical ailments.
  • Olive Oil – A traditional tree crop long used in foods and medicines.
  • Plantain – Considered to be one of the nine sacred herbs by the ancient Saxon people and has a long history of use as an alternative medicine dating back to ancient times.
  • Raspberry – Leaves and fruits used in a wide range of medical issues.
  • Sage – Used for thousands of years in cooking and like other culinary herbs, it has long been thought to be a digestive aid aid and appetite stimulant.
  • Skullcap – A powerful medicinal herb, it was cultivated Native Americans for use in several remedies. Pregnant women should not take Skullcap.
  • Slippery Elm – The tree had many traditional uses by Native Americans.
  • Sumac – Viewed by some tribes as a sacred plant, Sumac was used for both food and medicine.
  • Sweetflag – Has a very long history of medicinal use in many herbal traditions.
  • Wild Black Cherry – The dried inner bark was traditionally used in tea or syrups for several health problems.
  • Wild Rose – There are hundreds of species that have been used medicinally for thousands of years.
  • Wild Ginger – Native Americans used the roots as a seasoning as well as a medicinal herb.

 

Toothache:

  • Allspice – Dried unripe berries have long been used teas.
  • American Licorice – Chewed or used in teas for internal issues, in a poultice externally.
  • Black Raspberry – Roots and leaves are boiled into tea or chewed, and washes used externally.
  • Buffaloberry – Used as food and in herbal remedies. Overindulgence can cause severe problems including death.
  • Fendler’s Bladderpod – Used crushed leaves for internal and external use.
  • Ginger Root – Utilized as both a spice and medicine throughout the world.
  • Hops – Though most commonly known for its use in beer, it also has medicinal properties.
  • Plantain – Considered to be one of the nine sacred herbs by the ancient Saxon people and has a long history of use as an alternative medicine dating back to ancient times.
  • Saltbush – Many species used for a variety of conditions.
  • Slippery Elm – The tree had many traditional uses by Native Americans.
  • Sweetflag – Has a very long history of medicinal use in many herbal traditions.
  • Tobacco – Long been important in Native American culture for social, religious, ceremonial purposes as well as in medicinal remedies.
  • Willow – The leaves and bark of the willow tree have been used since times of ancient Egypt and Greece.

 

Nuwati Toxaway Tea

Nuwati Herbals’ Toxaway Tea – For detoxing, liver health, and skin. Available at Legends’ General Store.

Toxins (to eliminate):

  • Alfalfa – Utilized in teas or added to food for a variety of medicinal remedies.  Avoid if you have an auto-immune problem.
  • Uva Ursi – Used medicinally since the second century. Should not be used by pregnant women.
  • Yerba Mate – A species of Holly that has a long history as a medicinal herb.

 

Tuberculosis:

  • Buffaloberry – Used as food and in herbal remedies. Overindulgence can cause severe problems including death.
  • Hibiscus – Various species used in  traditional herbal medicines dating back to Roman times.
  • Horehound – Whole plant used internally and externally. People with gastritis or peptic ulcer disorders should use it cautiously.
  • Licorice Root – Used as flavoring in food and for herbal remedies.
  • Oak – Acorns and bark used for a variety of medical ailments.
  • Prickly Pear Cactus – Native Americans used the younger pads for food and in teas; while mature pads were used in poultices.
  • Sage – Used for thousands of years in cooking and like other culinary herbs, it has long been thought to be a digestive aid aid and appetite stimulant.
  • Goldenrod – Long used for a variety of ailments.
  • Shavegrass – Used for centuries as a remedy for various medical conditions.
  • Sumac – Viewed by some tribes as a sacred plant, Sumac was used for both food and medicine.
  • Tobacco – Long been important in Native American culture for social, religious, ceremonial purposes as well as in medicinal remedies.
  • Wild Black Cherry – The dried inner bark was traditionally used in tea or syrups for several health problems.
  • Wild Ginger – Native Americans used the roots as a seasoning as well as a medicinal herb.

 

Tumors:

  • Buck Brush – Applies to a number of North American shrubs used in herbal medicine.
  • Dong Quai – Used for more than a thousand years to treat a number of conditions.
  • Honeysuckle – Used in traditional herbal remedies for thousands of years.
  • Oat Straw – A food source and medical remedy since prehistoric times.
  • Olive Oil – A traditional tree crop long used in foods and medicines.
  • Pennyroyal – Long used to treat medical problems and to eradicate pests.Pennyroyal should not be used in any way by pregnant women. Over ingestion of this herb has caused death.
  • Senna – A large genus of flowering plants found to be helpful in many remedies.

 

Typhoid:

  • Cardinal Flower – Roots, leaf tea and poultices were used internally and externally.
  • Senna – A large genus of flowering plants found to be helpful in many remedies.

 

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Ulcer:

  • American Ginseng – Used in teas and tonics, and sometimes smoked by Native Americans.
  • Boswellia – Fragrant resin utilized in a variety of ailments. Pregnant or breast-feeding women should not use.
  • Buck Brush – Applies to a number of North American shrubs used in herbal medicine.
  • Burdock – Roots and leaves utilized internally and externally. Avoid if pregnant or nursing.
  • Geranium – Scented geranium used in teas for various conditions.
  • Native Hemlock – Used by Native Americans for several purposes.
  • Pau d’arco – Long used for a wide range conditions.
  • Shavegrass – Used for centuries as a remedy for various medical conditions.
  • Slippery Elm – The tree had many traditional uses by Native Americans.

 

Fill Your Medicine Bag

At Legends’ General Store

Urinary Problems:

  • Cat’s Claw – Used in teas and tonics for more than 2,000 years.
  • Dandelion – Used in both foods and internal and external medical remedies.
  • Goldenrod – Long used for a variety of ailments.
  • Goldenseal – Used internally and external for medicinal issues. Should not be taken by pregnant women.
  • Greenbriar – Teas and salves used internally and externally.
  • Guarana – Containing caffeine, it has many of the same effects as coffee.
  • Gymnema Sylvestre – Has been used as natural treatment for diabetes for nearly 2,000 years.
  • Horsemint – Leaves and flowering stems used in teas, tonics, and salves for a variety of medical issues. Should not be used by pregnant women.
  • Juniper – Used internally and externally for medicinal purposes. Pregnant women should not use this herb as it has been known to cause miscarriage.
  • Plantain – C onsidered to be one of the nine sacred herbs by the ancient Saxon people and has a long history of use as an alternative medicine dating back to ancient times.
  • Poke – Though parts of this plant are highly toxic to livestock and humans, it has long been used as a food and medicine by Native Americans.
  • Prickly Pear Cactus – Native Americans used the younger pads for food and in teas ; while mature pads were used in poultices.
  • Rose Hip – The fruit of the rose plant has long been used in teas to soothe a variety of problems.
  • Saw Palmetto – Long prized as a food product and  in medicinal remedies.
  • Shavegrass – Used for centuries as a remedy for various medical conditions.
  • Sumac – Viewed by some tribes as a sacred plant, Sumac was used for both food and medicine.
  • Tribulus –  This herb has been used in traditional medicine for centuries.
  • Uva Ursi – Used medicinally since the second century. Should not be used by pregnant women.
  • Wild Ginger – Native Americans used the roots as a seasoning as well as a medicinal herb.
  • Yarrow – Used for thousands of years, especially to stop bleeding.

 

Uterus Problems:

 

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Native Plants - Native Healing

Native Plants – Native Healing. From our Book Shelf at Legends’ General Store

Vaginal Problems including Dryness:

  • Black Cohosh – Roots of the plant were used in teas for a variety of ailments.
  • Slippery Elm – The tree had many traditional uses by Native Americans.

 

Varicose Veins:

 

Venereal Diseases:

  • Buffaloberry – Used as food and in herbal remedies. Overindulgence can cause severe problems including death.
  • Indian Paintbrush – Used for several purposes these plants are potentially toxic if the roots or green parts are consumed.
  • Milkweed – Though it can be toxic if not prepared properly, Milkweed was used as a food and medicine, as well as in making cords, ropes, and a coarse cloth. Warning: Milkweed may be toxic when taken internally, without sufficient preparation.
  • Rabbit Tobacco – Was thought to have had spiritual or mystic powers by many Indians.
  • Wild Ginger – Native Americans used the roots as a seasoning as well as a medicinal herb.

 

Vertigo:

  • Black Cohosh – Roots of the plant were used in teas for a variety of ailments.
  • Broom Snakeweed – Roots and leaves used in steam therapies, teas, and poultices.
  • Ginko Biloba – One of the most ancient trees in existence, it has been used for both food and medicine.
  • Tobacco – Long been important in Native American culture for social, religious, ceremonial purposes as well as in medicinal remedies.

 

Viruses:

  • Honeysuckle – Used in traditional herbal remedies for thousands of years.
  • Oak – Acorns and bark used for a variety of medical ailments.
  • Rosemary – Used for culinary purposes and in medicinal remedies.

 

Vomiting (to induce):

 

Vomiting (to stop):

 

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Warts:

  • Mayapple – Having been long surrounded by folklore, this plant was used for a variety of medical purposes. Because of its toxicity, this herb should only be used by professional Herbalists.
  • Milkweed – Though it can be toxic if not prepared properly, Milkweed was used as a food and medicine, as well as in making cords, ropes, and a coarse cloth. Warning: Milkweed may be toxic when taken internally, without sufficient preparation.

 

SeeLessO'Me Tea from Nuwati Herbals

Nuwati Herbals SeeLessO’Me Tea – For diet, appetite suppressant, energy, laxative, stomach soother and more. Available at Legends’ General Store

Weight (to reduce):

  • Boswellia – Fragrant resin utilized in a variety of ailments. Should not be used by the pregnant, breast-feeding women and children.
  • Evening Primrose – Used for both food and in medicinal remedies, decoctions were used for internal and external ailments.
  • Glucomannan – A dietary fiber that has long been used in Asia.  It is not recommended for use by pregnant or breast-feeding women.
  • Grapefruit – Seeds, pulp, and inner rind used for internal conditions.
  • Green Tea – Made solely with the leaves of Camellia Sinensis, it is known for its many helpful properties.
  • Lecithin – Found in several plants, it is beneficial for a variety of body systems.
  • Marshmallow Root – Dating back thousands of years, this root has been used as a food and medicine.
  • Stevia – An herb long used as a sweetener which also has medical remedy properties.
  • Wild Garlic – Used throughout its history for both culinary and medicinal purposes.
  • Yerba Mate – A species of Holly that has a long history as a medicinal herb.

 

Whooping Cough:

  • Broom Snakeweed – Roots and leaves used in steam therapies, teas, and poultices.
  • Cattail – Utilized as a food, as well as in external and internal medical remedies.
  • Horehound – Whole plant used internally and externally. People with gastritis or peptic ulcer disorders should use it cautiously.
  • Kola Nut – Long used in medicinal remedies, spiritual practices, and ceremonies. Should not be used by pregnant or nursing women, or those with intestinal or stomach ulcers, blood pressure, insomnia, or heart disorders.
  • Marshmallow Root – Dating back thousands of years, this root has been used as a food and medicine.
  • Red Clover – Traditionally used for a number of conditions.
  • Star Anise – The fruit of a small tree with a licorice-like flavor long used in medical remedies.
  • Wild Black Cherry – The dried inner bark was traditionally used in tea or syrups for several health problems.

Worms – See Intestinal Worms

 

Wounds:

  • Arnica – Used externally only for aches, pains, and wound. Poison if taken internally.
  • Broom Snakeweed – Roots and leaves used in steam therapies, teas, and poultices.
  • Buck Brush – Applies to a number of North American shrubs used in herbal medicine.
  • Buffaloberry – Used as food and in herbal remedies. Overindulgence can cause severe problems including death.
  • Cattail – Utilized as a food, as well as in external and internal medical remedies.
  • Chokecherry – Used as both a source of food and medicine, it was considered one of the most important herbs in Native American medicine.
  • Cotton – Roots, leaves, and seeds have been used in the treatment of many conditions.
  • Dogwood – B ark, berries, and twigs used in decoctions internally and externally.
  • Echinacea – Roots were chewed, dried in tea, or pulverized for external use.
  • Eucalyptus – Teas and ointments used for a variety of purposes.
  • Evening Primrose – Used for both food and in medicinal remedies, decoctions were used for internal and external ailments.
  • Fenugreek – Used internally and externally for a variety of medicinal purposes.
  • Gentiana – Extremely bitter herb used for both internal and external problems. May cause irritation in persons who have ulcers, and may also cause headache, nausea or vomiting.
  • Goldenrod – Long used for a variety of ailments.
  • Goldenseal – Used internally and external for medicinal issues. Should not be taken by pregnant women.
  • Green Tea – Made solely with the leaves of Camellia Sinensis, it is known for its many helpful properties.
  • Hibiscus – Various species used in  traditional herbal medicines dating back to Roman times.
  • Horehound – Whole plant used internally and externally. People with gastritis or peptic ulcer disorders should use it cautiously.
  • Horsemint – Leaves and flowering stems used in teas, tonics, and salves for a variety of medical issues. Should not be used by pregnant women.
  • Juniper – Used internally and externally for medicinal purposes. Pregnant women should not use this herb as it has been known to cause miscarriage.
  • Lemon Balm – A calming herb that has been used since the Middle Ages.
  • Marshmallow Root – Dating back thousands of years, this root has been used as a food and medicine.
  • Passion Flower – H as a long history of use among Native Americans that and were adapted by early European colonists. Do not take passionflower if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Plantain – Considered to be one of the nine sacred herbs by the ancient Saxon people and has a long history of use as an alternative medicine dating back to ancient times.
  • Prickly Pear Cactus – Native Americans used the younger pads for food and in teas; while mature pads were used in poultices.
  • Sarsaparilla – Used for centuries in a wide variety of medicinal remedies.
  • Shavegrass – Used for centuries as a remedy for various medical conditions.
  • Western Skunk Cabbage – This plant with a “skunky” has long been used by Native Americans as a topical medicine.
  • White Pine –  The inner bark, young shoots, twigs, pitch, and leaves have long been used by Native Americans in medicinal remedies.
  • Yarrow – Used for thousands of years, especially to stop bleeding.

 

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Yeast Infection:

  • Pau d’arco – Long used for a wide range conditions.
  • Uva Ursi – Used medicinally since the second century. Should not be used by pregnant women.

These many remedies listed here are only a small sample of those that have been used in the past and continue to be used today. Herbal remedies seem to be most useful for problems where prescription medications don’t truly solve the problem but only suppress the symptoms temporarily, have side effects that may be as bad as the problem itself, or cause addiction. Please note that some of the conditions require other kinds of intervention. Be sensible with your health and consult with your primary care professional when needed.

Mixing natural remedies and traditional treatments can many times be unwise. A doctor should be consulted before pregnant, nursing women, children, or babies, are given any type of herbal remedy.

Disclaimer:  These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and we make no medical claims, nor intend to diagnose, treat, or heal medical conditions. Women who are pregnant or nursing, or persons with known medical conditions should consult their physician before taking any herbal products.

Compiled by Kathy Weiser/Legends of America, updated April, 2017.

Also See:

Herbal Balms

Herbal Insect Repellant

Herbal Teas

Herbs & Healing Properties

Native American Medicine

Cherokee Medicine

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1 thought on “Native American and Other Ancient Remedies”

  1. I like to learn about natural health and have drank some of the herbal teas, they are good not to strong.i am really partial to the tea that taste like fruit.

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