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New Mexico Flag - High Country LegendsNEW MEXICO LEGENDS

Endee to San Jon - Another Ghostly 66 Stretch

 

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Endee

 

Five miles past Glenrio is the ghost town of Endee, New Mexico which had a population of 110 in 1946. Along the way you can view several abandoned homes and structures before arriving at Endee.

 

Endee was founded in 1882, gaining its name from the old ND ranch. A post office was established in 1886. Endee was originally a wild west town where cowpunchers went to blow off steam on Saturday nights. Some people claim that the town was so rough that a trench was dug on Saturday to bury the gunfight losers on Sunday. In 1950, 187 people made their home in Endee, but today, this town has been long abandoned and forgotten.

 

This old Endee Motor Court sits south of I-40 on original Route 66, now a dirt Road. May, 2004, Kathy Weiser

 

Bard

 

Continuing down this old dirt road to Bard, you will see the remains of an old Rock Island trestle. The settlement of Bard was also said to have been a wild town during the cowboy days, where drunkenness and shootouts were commonplace.

 

In the 1940's it was a trading center for local ranchers, consisting of a store, a gas station and several houses. At one time, Bard had 195 people, but by 1980 the town had been reduced to ten. Today, Bard, too, is but one more casualty of Route 66.

 

Continuing west on old Route 66, the dirt and gravel road will take you all the way to San Jon, if road conditions permit.

 

Bard, New Mexico

Bard, New Mexico, May, 2004, David Alexander.

 

Endee Motel and Cafe

This old Motel and Cafe sits along I-40 at the Bard,

New Mexico exit. December, 2004, Kathy Weiser.

San Jon

Another few miles along your journey, you’ll come to San Jon (pronounced San Hone), a small agricultural community curled up against the vast open spaces of Eastern New Mexico. This quiet village of just about 300 people is not quite a ghost town but many of its old businesses display otherwise. However, this was once a busy stop for early day Route 66 travelers with several gas stations, garages, motor courts, and restaurants.

 

The settlement was founded in 1902 and soon became an important ranching and shipping center when the railroad arrived just two years later.

 

 

 

Route 66 between Bard and Endee, New Mexico

Old Route 66 between Glenrio and Bard, New Mexico,

May, 2004, Kathy Weiser

 

In those vintage days, San Jon was the largest town on those eastern plains and was the hub of cowboy nightlife on Saturday nights. Unfortunately, its streets are quiet today, after having been passed by the interstate, lined with empty buildings testifying to better times.

Continuing on for a little more than twenty miles, you will soon arrive in Tucumcari. As you travel along watch for the many "Tucumcari Tonite” billboards, which have been popular since the vintage days of the Route 66.

 

 

© Kathy Weiser/Legends of America, updated November, 2010.

 

San Jon, New Mexico Service Station

Closed up Auto Service in San Jon, New Mexico,

December, 2004, Kathy Weiser

Old Gas Station in San Jon, New Mexico

Old Gas Station in San Jon, New Mexico,

December, 2004, Kathy Weiser.

 

"Pour House" in San Jon, New Mexico

The "Pour House" in San Jon, New Mexico ain't

pouring anymore beverages these days.

December, 2004, Kathy Weiser.

 

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Tucumcari Tonite

These Tucumcari Tonite road signs have dotted old Route 66 since its earliest days. December, 2004, Kathy Weiser.

 

  Return to Route 66 

 

To Tucumari

 

Return to Route 66

 

A Brightly Lit Route 66

 

From Legends' General Store

 

Route 66 Postcard Route 66 Postcards - Legends of America and the Legends' General Store has collected numerous postcards for our Route 66 enthusiasts. For many of these, we have only one available. To see this varied collection, click HERE!

 

   All signs point to Route 66!  Greetings From Missouri Route 66 Postcard   

 

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