What’s New

Here’s more on the latest additions to our website:

Code Young – Cowboy Outlaw – Hailing from Texas, Code Young was working as a cowboy near Roswell, New Mexico before becoming a member of the High Fives Gang.

George West Musgrave

George West Musgrave – All-Around Bad Man – An outlaw member of the High Fives Gang, Musgrave, a cheerful and soft-spoken man, was a cattle rustler, robber, and killer.

Bob Hayes- Riding With the High Fives Gang – Bob Hayes, aka: Sam Hassell, John West was an outlaw, he began his criminal career as a horse thief before becoming a member of the High Fives Gang.

Black Jack Will Christian

Will “Black Jack” Christian – Leading the High Fives Gang – Will “Black Jack” Christian was the leader of a gang of robbers called the High Fives Gang, committing crimes in Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Arizona.

Jules Beni – Corruption and Violence in Old Julesburg, Colorado – Jules Beni (sometimes referred to as Jules Reni) was a western outlaw who was the corrupt manager of the Central Overland, California & Pike’s Peak Express.

Oregon-California Trail Facts – Dozens of facts about the overland trails to the west coast.

Crime and Punishment on the Overland Trails – Given the extremes which tested overland trail emigrants to their limits, the evidence of crime among the travelers was low, but it did happen.

Trading with the Indians

Indians and Emigrants on the Overland Trails – Contrary to Hollywood depictions and popular myths that portray the natives in a negative light as savages, the historical record presents a different story.

Oregon-California Trail Timeline – For 25 years, as many as 500,000 people traveled the overland trails to Oregon, California, and Utah. Here’s a timeline that looks at events leading up to and through the migration.

Ephraim Brown – Murdered on the Oregon Trail – Missouri pioneer, Ephraim James Brown, is the only man who was murdered on the Oregon Trail whose grave remains with a known location.

Why a Trail to Oregon? – All explorers, nearly all pioneers, and certainly all the fur traders who headed to the American West belonged to a restless breed. Excerpted from The Oregon Trail; the Missouri River to the Pacific Ocean, Federal Writers Project, 1939.

Hall Jackson Kelley – Promoting the Oregon Trail – Hall Jackson Kelley was writer and teacher from New England who was known for his strong advocacy for western settlement of the Oregon Country in the 1830s.

Oregon Trail pioneers pass through the sand hills, painting by William Henry Jackson

Disease and Death on the Overland Trails – Healthcare in the frontier was an imperfect science in the mid-19th century, and mortality rates were lamentably high.

Danger and Hardship on the Oregon Trail – Though much of written history looks at the 2,000-mile Oregon Trail as romantic, almost one in ten who embarked on the trail would not survive.

Historic Idaho City, Idaho

Idaho City, Idaho – Queen of the Boise Basin – Idaho City, Idaho was once bustling with miners living in the largest town between St. Louis and San Francisco.

Sumner Pinkham

Sumner Pinkham – Dead at the Hands of a Gunfighter – Sumner Pinkham, who was the first sheriff of Boise County, Idaho was killed by gunfighter Ferd Patterson in 1865.

Ferd Patterson – Living and Dying by the Gun  Ferdinand “Ferd” J. Patterson was a “dandy” gambler, gunfighter, and outright killer who made the rounds of California, Idaho, and Oregon, and Washington.

Sailor’s Diggings & the Triskitt Gang’s Lost Loot – The bustling miners camp of Sailors’ Diggings, Oregon was visited by the murderous Triskett Gang, who were said to have left behind their stolen loot. Today there’s nothing left of the town that was once the county seat.

Wagon Train Attack

Utter-Van Ornum Massacre – In 1860 one of the worst massacres along the Oregon Trail took place in Idaho involving a wagon train of 44 people who would be attacked by Indians.

Sager Orphans on the Oregon Trail – The Sager family traveled the Oregon Trail in 1844. The children were orphaned and would suffer more tragedy before their ordeal was complete.

April Newsletter – The latest from our world includes a hat tip to our Texas friend, some campfire goodies, popular stories of the last month on our social media and much more.

Mormon Handcart Pioneers

Mormon Handcart Pioneers

Mormon Handcart Tragedy of 1856 – The Mormon handcart pioneers were participants in the migration of members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1856, over 200 would perish on their journey.

Henry Hudson – An English explorer, Hudson is best known for his explorations of present-day Canada and parts of the northeastern United States.

March Newsletter – We’re back on TV… well, any streaming device really.. and Arizona Ghostriders has some fun with words using Legends of America. That and Women’s History Month in the latest from our world.

Massacre in Michigan – The Bath School Disaster – Still the deadliest attack on a U.S. School, the Bath School Disaster resulted in the deaths of 44, mainly children, in a small Michigan village in 1927.

February Newsletter – Our latest newsletter includes a salute to Black History Month, a cool ghost town in New Mexico, Presidential Trivia and more!

Wyatt Earp

Tales of the Shotgun-Messenger Service – What was once lost is new again! Kathy added this great story written by Wyatt Earp years ago, but apparently it was never linked to from other pages, and probably never viewed. So it’s new right? Wyatt tells of the Wells Fargo Shotgun-Messenger Service in this piece he wrote in 1896.

January Newsletter – The latest from our world, featured stories and more.

The Beast of Bray Road – Labeled as a werewolf by some witnesses, this creature was allegedly seen near Elkhorn, Wisconsin is described as bear-like, as a hairy biped resembling Bigfoot, and an intelligent wolf-like creature which walk on its hind legs.

Reed Gold Mine – The Reed Gold Mine in Cabarrus County, North Carolina is the site of the first documented gold find in the United States.

Smallest church in Onieda, New York

New York Fun Facts & Trivia – Fun facts and trivia about New York State.

Cades Cove Scenic Loop (by Ann Johnson) – “An 11 mile journey through the Great Smoky Mountains includes hiking, bike trails, horseback riding and plenty of history.

Fort Mackinac, Michigan by Detroit Publishing, 1899

Mackinac Island, Michigan – Advancing the Frontier – Mackinac Island is of outstanding significance in the history of the old Northwest and the advance of the frontier.

Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin – Fur Trading Mecca– Located on a broad terrace overlooking the Mississippi River, Prairie du Chien was a crossroads of the fur trade in the old Northwest.

Bloody Island, California

Bloody Island, California

Bloody Island Massacre, California – Bloody Island derives its name from the Clear Lake Massacre of 1850 in which 60 of the 400 Indians who had taken refuge there were killed in a miscarriage of justice.

Diminishing the Indians in California – From 1850 to the 1870s laws and treaties were passed to diminish the rights and lands of the Native Americans in California.

California Indian Battles – Battles and Massacres of the Indian Wars in California.

Dighton Rock and its Puzzling Petroglyphs, Massachusetts – Known for its puzzling petroglyphs, Dighton Rock is one of the greatest mysteries of Massachusetts.

 

To see what else you might have missed, check out our archive of newsletters here

 

3 thoughts on “What’s New”

  1. Yes it quite interesting and informative always had an interest in history I will visit this site more often and tell my friends Robert Jose pH Leonard

  2. Interesting and crazy people then just as s there is now Robert Joseph Leonard distant relative of the Great Scott General Winfield Scott first American General to conquer Mexico another Nation

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